papers: publish preprint of SANER 2020 deps paper
authorStefano Zacchiroli <zack@upsilon.cc>
Sat, 4 Jan 2020 16:41:57 +0000 (17:41 +0100)
committerStefano Zacchiroli <zack@upsilon.cc>
Sat, 4 Jan 2020 16:41:57 +0000 (17:41 +0100)
research/publications.mdwn
research/publications/saner-2020-deps.bib
research/publications/saner-2020-deps.pdf [new file with mode: 0644]

index 633429e..1d9e213 100644 (file)
@@ -192,7 +192,7 @@ You might also be interested in my author profiles on
     [[!toggle id=id77 text="Abstract..."]] [[!toggleable id=id77 text="""
     *Abstract:* We consider the problem of mining the development history—as captured by modern version control systems—of ultra-large-scale software archives (e.g., tens of millions software repositories corresponding). We show that graph compression techniques can be applied to the problem, dramatically reducing the hardware resources needed to mine similarly-sized corpus. As a concrete use case we compress the full Software Heritage archive, consisting of 5 billion unique source code files and 1 billion unique commits, harvested from more than 80 million software projects—encompassing a full mirror of GitHub. The resulting compressed graph fits in less than 100 GB of RAM, corresponding to a hardware cost of less than 300 U.S. dollars. We show that the compressed in-memory representation of the full corpus can be accessed with excellent performances, with edge lookup times close to memory random access. As a sample exploitation experiment we show that the compressed graph can be used to conduct clone detection at this scale, benefiting from main memory access speed.
     """]]
- 1. <a class="bibtex-download" href="saner-2020-deps.bib" title="download bibliographic entry in BibTeX format">[.bib]</a> <a href="http://mancoosi.org/~abate/about-me">Pietro Abate</a>, <a href="http://www.dicosmo.org">Roberto Di Cosmo</a>, <a href="http://www.gousios.gr/">Georgios Gousios</a>, <a href="http://upsilon.cc/~zack">Stefano Zacchiroli</a>. **Dependency Solving: Looking Back, Going Forward**.  <em>
+ 1. <a class="paper-download" href="saner-2020-deps.pdf" title="download paper in PDF format">[.pdf]</a> <a class="bibtex-download" href="saner-2020-deps.bib" title="download bibliographic entry in BibTeX format">[.bib]</a> <a href="http://mancoosi.org/~abate/about-me">Pietro Abate</a>, <a href="http://www.dicosmo.org">Roberto Di Cosmo</a>, <a href="http://www.gousios.gr/">Georgios Gousios</a>, <a href="http://upsilon.cc/~zack">Stefano Zacchiroli</a>. **Dependency Solving Is Still Hard, but We Are Getting Better at It**.  <em>
        To appear in proceedings of <a href="https://saner2020.csd.uwo.ca/">SANER 2020</a>: The 27th IEEE
        International Conference on Software Analysis, Evolution and
        Reengineering, February 18-21, 2020, London, Ontario,
index 775160f..13ee995 100644 (file)
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
 @inproceedings{saner-2020-deps,
   author = {Pietro Abate and Di Cosmo, Roberto and Georgios Gousios and Stefano Zacchiroli},
-  title = {Dependency Solving: Looking Back, Going Forward},
+  title = {Dependency Solving Is Still Hard, but We Are Getting Better at It},
   abstract = {Dependency solving is a hard (NP-complete) problem in all non-trivial component models due to either mutually incompatible versions of the same packages or explicitly declared package conflicts. As such, software upgrade planning needs to rely on highly specialized dependency solvers, lest falling into pitfalls such as incompleteness—a combination of package versions that satisfy dependency constraints does exist, but the package manager is unable to find it. In this paper we look back at proposals from dependency solving research dating back a few years. Specifically, we review the idea of treating dependency solving as a separate concern in package manager implementations, relying on generic dependency solvers based on tried and tested techniques such as SAT solving, PBO, MILP, etc. By conducting a census of dependency solving capabilities in state-of-the-art package managers we conclude that some proposals are starting to take off (e.g., SAT-based dependency solving) while—with few exceptions—others have not (e.g., outsourcing dependency solving to reusable components). We reflect on why that has been the case and look at novel challenges for dependency solving that have emerged since.},
   publisher = {IEEE},
   year = {2020},
diff --git a/research/publications/saner-2020-deps.pdf b/research/publications/saner-2020-deps.pdf
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..3dd20be
Binary files /dev/null and b/research/publications/saner-2020-deps.pdf differ